Visit the Greek American Women's Network (GAWN) Homepage A)? GHT="50">
Compact version
Today's Suggestion
Read The "Macedonian Question" (by Maria Nystazopoulou-Pelekidou)
HomeAbout HR-NetNewsWeb SitesDocumentsOnline HelpUsage InformationContact us
Monday, 23 November 2020
 
News
  Latest News (All)
     From Greece
     From Cyprus
     From Europe
     From Balkans
     From Turkey
     From USA
  Announcements
  World Press
  News Archives
Web Sites
  Hosted
  Mirrored
  Interesting Nodes
Documents
  Special Topics
  Treaties, Conventions
  Constitutions
  U.S. Agencies
  Cyprus Problem
  Other
Services
  Personal NewsPaper
  Greek Fonts
  Tools
  F.A.Q.
 

Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English, 03-01-01

Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article

From: The Cyprus Mail at <http://www.cyprus-mail.com/>


Wednesday, January 1, 2003

<OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN=""> <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

CONTENTS

  • [01] Clerides appeals to Turkish Cypriots
  • [02] Cypriot clone doctor: 'where's the proof of baby Eve?'
  • [03] AKEL gearing up to face Clerides or Markides
  • [04] Market ends another annus horribilis
  • [05] The end of the Wessex
  • [06] Knifepoint kiosk robbery

  • [01] Clerides appeals to Turkish Cypriots

    By Jean Christou

    PRESIDENT Glafcos Clerides said last night the Greek Cypriot side would spare no effort in order to achieve a solution to the Cyprus problem.

    In his annual New Year's televised address, Clerides said he particularly felt the need to address himself to the Turkish Cypriots, disillusioned that their leader Rauf Denktash had refused to allow a Cyprus deal to be signed at the EU summit in Copenhagen in mid December. Since then, Turkish Cypriots have called for Denktash to resign and have held massive protests in the north.

    "I assure them that we are equally interested in their own peaceful and creative future, for the security, progress and prosperity in a united Cyprus which will be a member of the European Union," Clerides said. "We are already working in this direction," the President added, referring to a package of economic measures drawn up after Copenhagen to help the Turkish Cypriots.

    But while the Greek Cypriot side is ready to "spare no effort" for a solution "we expect them to make their own contribution," Clerides said. Denktash, recovering from heart surgery in the US in October, has said he is willing to negotiate on the plan drawn up by UN Secretary-general Kofi Annan, but insists on radical changes to maps, sovereignty and the right of Greek Cypriots to live in Turkish Cypriot administered areas.

    The two leaders are due to resume negotiations on January 7 with the aim of reaching a settlement by February 28.

    In his brief address, Clerides said he would not deal in detail with the political issues but confine himself to expressing his good wishes. "On the eve of the New Year I wish our Turkish Cypriot compatriots all the best," he said. "Especially I wish that the New Year will be the landmark year during which our common vision for Cyprus will be realised."

    Referring to the Copenhagen summit and its green light for Cyprus to join in May 2004, Clerides said the government felt justifiably proud in securing the decision for Cyprus to be accepted as a member of the bloc.

    "It is generally accepted that this is a historic achievement, the most important achievement following the establishment of the Cyprus Republic (in 1960)," he said, thanking the Greek government for its decisive role in the process.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002

    <OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN="">

    <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

    [02] Cypriot clone doctor: 'where's the proof of baby Eve?'

    By Jean Christou

    CYPRIOT American fertility expert Panayiotis Zavos, one of several scientists racing to produce human clones, said yesterday he was very concerned and "extremely sceptical" of last week's claim by a UFO sect to have delivered the first cloned baby.

    Zavos, who visited Cyprus in March 2001 and unofficially asked the government to allow him to use Cyprus to stage his cloning experiments but was refused, asked in a written statement to the Cyprus Mail yesterday: "Where is the proof?"

    Last week, Dr. Brigitte Boisselier, director of Clonaid, a 'bishop' of the Raelian sect, which believes humans are clones of aliens, claimed to have won the cloning race by announcing that a baby 'Eve' had been born at an undisclosed location.

    "I would like to suggest that in the absence of any evidence, it's impossible to judge whether the delivery of Eve happened or not," Zavos said.

    "It is easy for someone like Dr. Boisselier to announce the delivery of a pregnancy, but it is rather difficult to prove that those two are indeed... cloned. I am hoping that Dr. Boisselier knows and understands the seriousness of what she is announcing to the world... a cloned baby or a cloned baby with all the necessary proof and documentation."

    Zavos, who runs a fertility clinic in Kentucky in the US and who also expects to deliver a cloned baby this year, said Dr. Boisselier needed to offer to the world independent confirmation of the events and developments.

    "If she has accomplished such an event, we stand ready to congratulate her but until we have all the facts we remain very sceptical," he added.

    "We are totally committed to carry on with our effort and also simultaneously tell the world what we have done and provide the proof."

    The issue of cloning was highlighted in Cyprus earlier this year, when Zavos visited the island and unofficially with health and other government officials.

    Zavos and his then Italian partner Severino Antonini, with whom he has since parted ways, were working towards cloning a human baby by the end of 2002.

    His visit, coupled with comments that the cloning would be carried out on an unnamed Mediterranean island and the fact that Cyprus at the time had no legislation on the issue, gave rise to reports that the island might be the base for his cloning efforts.

    However, the government made it clear that Cyprus would not go against a Council of Europe protocol, which bans human cloning even for fertility purposes and rushed to implement legal guidelines.

    Since then, the House has passed legislation banning cloning, and the government has set up a bioethics committee to examine to what extent any cloning or bioethical issue should be approved in Cyprus.

    Zavos said in the US last month that he had harvested the necessary cells and would achieve pregnancy early this year, with another seven or eight women "ready to go". His first cloned baby would be delivered later in 2003, he said. The location of the woman is still a secret but he has promised to deliver proof of every step in the process.

    "Because simply if we decide to have a pregnancy and before we get on the air to tell you about it, we will have the proof along with it. We intend to carry on with the same principle, that is telling the world about an event, but also showing them the evidence," he told one American radio station.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002

    <OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN="">

    <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

    [03] AKEL gearing up to face Clerides or Markides

    By George Psyllides

    PRESIDENT Glafcos Clerides or Attorney-general Alecos Markides will be DIKO chief Tassos Papadopoulos' main opponent in the presidential elections, not KISOS chairman Yiannakis Omirou, AKEL leader Demetris Christofias said yesterday.

    Speaking to a Paphos radio station, Christofias said either Clerides or Markides would be contesting the elections against Papadopoulos and not Omirou.

    Commenting on DISY appeals that AKEL should behave responsibly and agree to an extension of Clerides' term in office for a specified period, Christofias said DISY was playing with the dignity of AKEL supporters and leadership.

    He said the ruling party had spent its term in power insulting people's dignity and now had the gall to appeal to the sense of honesty of leftists who had been brought up on the milk of pacifism and the desire for a solution to the Cyprus problem.

    "There are no dramatic developments on the national issue right now to justify an extension of President Clerides' term," Christofias said.

    "Everything is being manipulated by DISY because they want to stay in power."

    If there was a ray of opportunity for the Cyprus problem to be solved, then his party "would not throw the chance in the bin only to come to power," Christofias said.

    He added claims to the contrary were an insult to him and his party.

    Commenting on statements by DISY chief Nicos Anastassiades, who claimed Papadopoulos had already promised five people the foreign ministry and 30 more the remaining Cabinet posts, the DIKO leader said Anastassiades effectively conceded that he would be the next president.

    Papadopoulos insisted he had not spoken about ministries to anyone, adding he was happy no one had asked for a ministry or any other position.

    He rejected charges that he could not stand Turkish Cypriots, adding that he had no need to issue certificates or apologise to anyone.

    Papadopoulos said he supported proper rapprochement and not when it was done selectively.

    Omirou for his part reiterated his candidacy, adding that his party could co-operate to extend Clerides' term for a short period if reasonable conditions existed to resolve the Cyprus problem.

    "At this moment there are no such conditions," Omirou added.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002

    <OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN="">

    <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

    [04] Market ends another annus horribilis

    By Jean Christou

    AN earlier-than-usual trading session saw the Cyprus Stock Exchange (CSE) ending yet another 'annus horribilis' on a slightly upward note, but with no cause for celebration.

    The all-share index ended at only 94.5 points with a 1.1 per cent increase, while blue chips, the mainstay of the market, closed 0.09 per cent down. Total volume for the day stood at only 1.2 million.

    Sectoral closings fluctuated wildly from losses in tourism of 1.54 per cent, anticipating a US-led war in Iraq, to gains of 7.2 per cent in the technology sector. Banks closed 0.45 per cent higher on the day after a disappointing year that saw their prices at one point plunge to under 1.00.

    Bank of Cyprus shed one cent to end at 1.34 while Laiki gained one cent to close at 1.27 and Hellenic fell one cent to 75 cents.

    According to analysts, losses for the year totalled 26.68 per cent, not as dramatic as 2000 and 2001. The most important event to have affected the market was Cyprus' acceptance as an EU member at the Copenhagen summit in December, in anticipation of which the index shot up past the 100-point mark. However, the good news failed to sustain the euphoria and immediately after Copenhagen stock prices slid back under.

    Analysts say events that will affect the market in 2003 are primarily linked to company results, most of which are negative, and to the the course of the Cyprus problem, which has a February 28 deadline and is tied to possible presidential elections, the referendum on EU accession in March and the signing of the EU Treaty of Accession in April. On the positive side, analysts say that new taxation rules will give companies a chance to improve their profitability, which would play a part in luring some investors back to the market. "It's really anyone's guess how the market will go in 2003," said one analyst.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002

    <OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN="">

    <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

    [05] The end of the Wessex

    THE British bases yesterday announced they were replacing the Wessex helicopters stationed at RAF Akrotiri.

    The 84 Squadron Wessex helicopters, whose tasks include search and rescue (SAR) and fire fighting, will be temporarily replaced by Sea King helicopters from the 203 Squadron based at RAF St. Mawgan in England.

    The Sea King will be on duty at the bases for up to three months until the Bell 412 Griffin is introduced into service.

    The Sea Kings will be transported to Cyprus by sea and are expected to arrive in Limassol tomorrow.

    They will be assembled there, fuelled and flown to Akrotiri, where crews will undergo training before assuming SAR and fire fighting missions until the end of March.

    The ageing Wessex helicopters were withdrawn from service yesterday.

    The Griffins will replace them when the crews complete their training by the end of March.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002

    <OBJECT classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6, 0,0,0" WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" id="e_savings" ALIGN="">

    <EMBED src="esavings.swf" quality=high bgcolor=#FFFFFF WIDTH="215" HEIGHT="70" NAME="esavings" ALIGN="" TYPE="application/x-shockwave-flash" PLUGINSPAGE="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer">

    [06] Knifepoint kiosk robbery

    POLICE were yesterday investigating a knifepoint robbery at a kiosk in Nicosia on Monday night.

    The owner of the kiosk on Athinon Street in Strovolos told police that she was robbed by a young man at around 8.30pm.

    The man picked up a box of chewing gum and when he approached her to pay, drew a knife and threatened Eleni Pandiscou, saying he would kill her if she did not hand over the cash.

    Pandiskou handed him 400 from the cash box and the man fled.

    Pandiskou told police the robber had apparently cut himself with the knife as she saw blood on his fingers.

    The man was described as slim and 1.65 metres tall. He wore black clothes and a green cap during the robbery.

    Nicosia CID are investigating.

    Copyright Cyprus Mail 2002


    Cyprus Mail: News Articles in English Directory - Previous Article - Next Article
    Back to Top
    Copyright © 1995-2016 HR-Net (Hellenic Resources Network). An HRI Project.
    All Rights Reserved.

    HTML by the HR-Net Group / Hellenic Resources Institute, Inc.
    cmnews2html v1.00 run on Wednesday, 1 January 2003 - 14:01:20 UTC