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U.S. Department of State
1996 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, March 1997

United States Department of State

Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

International Organizations

International organizational efforts continue to be a key component of the overall US counternarcotics strategy. Through multilateral organizations the United States has the opportunity to multiply contributions from other donors and decrease the perception that drugs are exclusively a US problem. The US participation in multilateral programs also supports indigenous capabilities in regions where the US is unable to operate bilaterally for political or logistical reasons. Moreover, the US contributions to UNDCP have had significant impact on the operations and expansion of UN counternarcotics programs and policy.

UNDCP has increased the number of projects as well as expanded the scope of its effort to include emerging drug source areas such as Vietnam, Cambodia, and the Central Asian states. US contributions to UNDCP have had significant impact on the operations and expansion of UN counternarcotics programs and policy. In the past year, the level of US contributions has also led to increased commitment from other donors, whose primary vehicle for international drug control efforts continues to be the UN. Recent US contributions to UNDCP have led to:

  • an expansion of the Southeast Asia program which targets the largest opium producer, Burma through a cooperative program that includes China, Thailand, and Laos. In addition to new programs in Vietnam and Cambodia the program now includes a pilot project in the Wa-controlled area of Burma and a project for the Kachin-controlled area;
  • development of a program to support the eradication campaign in key opium cultivation areas in the second largest opium producer, Afghanistan;
  • provision of UNDCP chemical control investigative training and administrative advice in Southwest Asia and Latin America;
  • continuation of a maritime cooperation program;
  • establishment of a regional training project in the Caribbean to train prosecutors and judges in order to improve conviction rates on narcotics-related cases;
  • the continuation of a demand reduction training center for Central European nations;
  • provision of legislative advice which led to significant changes in antidrug laws in Central Europe and the Newly Independent States (NIS) in order to implement the 1988 UN Convention;
  • coordination of bilateral and multilateral assistance to Eastern Europe and the NIS, and provision of training and advice to bolster law enforcement and customs institutions.
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